Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab


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Why is rehabilitation relevant?

Systematic review of non-pharmacologic interventions to delay functional decline in community-dwelling patients with dementia. McLoughlin, J. Defining rehabilitation success in older adults with dementia—results from an inpatient geriatric rehabilitation unit — Springer. A 2 year multidomain intervention of diet, exercise, cognitive training, and vascular risk monitoring versus control to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people FINGER : a randomised controlled trial.

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The Lancet, , — Regan, B. Ritchie, C. The Lancet. Psychiatry, 3 2 , — Santos, G. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, 42 6 , — Schultz-Larsen, K. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 60 3 , — Schwenk, M. An intensive exercise program improves motor performances in patients with dementia: translational model of geriatric rehabilitation. Improvements in gait characteristics after intensive resistance and functional training in people with dementia: a randomised controlled trial. BMC Geriatrics, 14, Seitz, D.

Caregiver Training: Sleep Disturbances - UCLA Alzheimer's and Dementia Care Program

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 64 1 , 47— Smith, P. The vestibular system and cognition. Current Opinion in Neurology, 30 1 , Stein, J. Results of the German study on ageing, cognition, and dementia in primary care patients AgeCoDe. Psychological Assessment, 27 3 , — Tanner, J. A randomized controlled trial of a community-based dementia care coordination intervention: effects of MIND at Home on caregiver outcomes.

Toots, A. Effects of a high-intensity functional exercise program on ADLS and balance in people with dementia: a cluster randomised controlled trial.


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Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 64 1 , 55— Verbeek, H. Small, homelike care environments for older people with dementia: a literature review. Verghese, J.

Rehabilitation in dementia. Journal of the Neurological Sciences. Share this:. Like this: Like Loading Related posts. Thanks for the list Kate. I will work my way through it today. Up side I guess is that James is on the same page as you Kate maybe some light at the end of the tunnel x ness Like Like. Thanks very much for this resource Kate! My absolute pleasure Craig! More on the way! You are very welcome to respectfully join this global conversation.

Cancel reply Enter your comment here Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:. Login Register. Eversound , a headset-based sound system that addresses communication barriers. S3 Balance , a device facilitating sit-to-stand transfers and exercise. LightWellness, a wireless system using LED lights for cognitive training. You can try to pursue the medical investigation further if you feel you need to. But I would encourage you to instead get help processing your grief and guilt.

Even when people are quite careful, accidents happen.

Perspectives – Journal of Humanities in Rehabilitation

Remember that you were involved caring for her during this last phase of life, which was a wonderful gift to her that not all older people get to enjoy. Remember also that if she was declining from her dementia and other conditions, she was likely to die within a few years no matter what you did. But life happens in certain ways and we have to accept it. So…please try to remember all the things you did for her, and also try to accept that usually we can never know exactly what happened or why things happened as they did, and part of the process is trying to make peace with this.

I read your article and several others.. I appreciate how you explained the different things to look for and how to treat.. My mother had been slowly but stedily declining from alzheimers, for years.. One thing that always made her happy was walking around her yard looking at her flowers, one of those days the neighbor had his dogs out again without a leash, they attacked my mom.

At the hospital I explained the whole story. But mom kept saying they just knocked her down. Anyway long story short since that day she was back and forth to dr. I kept telling everyone that would listen that her memory was getting worse. Within 8 months of the day she was looking at her flowers and was attacked she passed away..

Improving the Lives of People with Dementia

Never went for a walk around her house again. You may find it helpful to connect with others who have also lost an older parent and are missing that person intensely. My husband is. I just nod a lot and smile. What can I do? Smiling and being supportive is a good start.

Rehabilitation for people living with dementia: A practical framework of positive support

I would recommend you find a caregiver support group, either locally and in-person, or online. Other caregivers will have lots of ideas and suggestions for you. Good luck. This is a very useful and informative article. My mother was sent to hospital due to Influenza A with high fever in mid We believe that she suffered delirium during her stay in hospital. We are not sure whether it was due to her high fever or not but she was disoriented and talking a bit nonsense. We told the doctor-in-charge who arranged an occupational therapist to do a MMSE test on her.

The result was, as expected, very low — 16 scores. I find it strange that why the doctor decided to do this test in that situation. Before her stay in the hospital, her score was My mother was discharged a few days later but the condition was improved very slightly and slowly. Last year, she did another MMSE test and her score was MMSEs and other forms of bedside cognitive testing are sometimes done in the hospital, but they should not be used to diagnose or confirm dementia, because there is such a high chance that an older person is delirious and hence will have worse mental function than usual.

My mother 75yrs old had her first episode of dementia about a year and a half ago. I brought her to the hospital and they did all the scan and blood test and nothing came up. The episode been on and off for the past year and half. The doctors diagnosed her with uti and gave her antibiotics to treat it. She did get better after taking antibiotics, but episodes keep coming back and she has been in and out of hospitals many times in past months.

Manual Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab

Her memory is decling rapidly these past few weeks. She needs help getting dressed and do daily task when she is confused. Your feelings of burn out are also very concerning. To get started with this, I recommend joining an online support group for people caring for aging parents. There is a very active one at AgingCare. Support groups are especially good for getting advice and moral support on dealing with family members and finding other sources of help.

Other good resources to try: Family Caregiver Alliance Care Navigator Your local Area Agency on Aging find it using this locator service Search for local nonprofits that offer support to people caring for aging parents. You will need to take care of yourself in order to have the energy and ability to advocate for your mom, and help figure out what is going on with her medically. What a brilliant article. My 80 year old next door neighbour was admitted to hospital 3 weeks ago with infections caused by her foot ulcer, which developed about 6 months ago.

She has no next of kin as she is an only child, she has no children and her husband died over 20 years ago.

Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab
Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab
Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab
Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab
Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab
Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab
Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab Perspectives on Rehabilitation and Dementia: Think Rehab

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